Nach Oben

Abstract

Tomato leaves under stress: a comparison of stress response to mild abiotic stress between a cultivated and a wild tomato species

Abstract: Tomato is one of the most produced crop plants on earth and growing in the fields and greenhouses all over the world. Breeding with known traits of wild species can enhance stress tolerance of cultivated crops. In this study, we investigated responses of the transcriptome as well as primary and secondary metabolites in leaves of a cultivated and a wild tomato to several abiotic stresses such as nitrogen deficiency, chilling or warmer temperatures, elevated light intensities and combinations thereof. The wild species responded different to varied temperature conditions compared to the cultivated tomato. Nitrogen deficiency caused the strongest responses and induced in particular the secondary metabolism in both species but to much higher extent in the cultivated tomato. Our study supports the potential of a targeted induction of valuable secondary metabolites in green residues of horticultural production, that will otherwise only be composted after fruit harvest. In particular, the cultivated tomato showed a strong induction in the group of mono caffeoylquinic acids in response to nitrogen deficiency. In addition, the observed differences in stress responses between cultivated and wild tomato can lead to new breeding targets for better stress tolerance.



Reimer, J.J., Thiele, B., Biermann, R.T, Junker-Froh, L., Wiese-Klinkenberg, A., Usadel, B., Wormit, A. 2021 . Tomato leaves under stress: a comparison of stress response to mild abiotic stress between a cultivated and a wild tomato species. Plant Mol Biol 107, 177–206.

Doi: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11103-021-01194-0