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Abstract

Boiling and steaming induced changes in secondary metabolites in three different cultivars of pak choi (Brassica rapa subsp. chinensis)

Pak choi (Brassica rapa subsp. chinensis) is a leafy vegetable that is widely available in Asia and consumed in rising quantities in Europe. Pak choi contains high levels of secondary plant metabolites, such as carotenoids, chlorophylls, glucosinolates, phenolic compounds, and vitamin K, which are beneficial for humans if consumed on a regular basis. The evaluation of the genotype-induced variation of secondary plant metabolites revealed that the cultivar ‘Amur’ contained the highest concentration of secondary plant metabolites. Furthermore, steaming retained more chlorophylls, glucosinolates, phenolic acids and flavonoid compounds than boiling. In contrast, both domestic cooking methods – boiling, and steaming – reduced the formation of glucosinolate breakdown products, especially the undesired epithionitriles and nitriles but less of the health-beneficial isothiocyanates.



Chen, X.; Hanschen, F.S.; Neugart, S.; Schreiner, M.; Vargas, S.A.; Gutschmann, B.; Baldermann, S. 2019. Boiling and steaming induced changes in secondary metabolites in three different cultivars of pak choi (Brassica rapa subsp. chinensis). Journal of Food Composition and Analysis, 82, 103232.

DOI: 10.1016/j.jfca.2019.06.004