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Abstract

Auxins or sugars: what makes the difference in the adventitious rooting of stored carnation cuttings.

Cold storage of cuttings is frequently applied in the vegetative propagation of ornamental plants. Dianthus caryophyllus was used to study the limiting influences of auxin and sugars on adventitious root formation (ARF) in cuttings stored at 5°C. Carbohydrate levels during storage were modulated by exposing cuttings to low light or darkness. The resulting cuttings were treated (or not) with auxin and planted, and then ARF was evaluated. Carbohydrate levels in the cuttings were monitored and the influence of light treatment on indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and zeatin (Z) in the basal stem was investigated. Dark storage for up to 4 weeks increased the percentage of early rooted cuttings and the final number and length of adventitious roots, despite decreased sugar levels in the stem base. Light during cold storage greatly enhanced sugar levels, particularly in the stem base where the Z/IAA ratio was higher and ARF was lower than observed in the corresponding dark-stored cuttings. Sugar levels in nonstored and dark-stored cuttings increased during the rooting period, and auxin application enhanced the accumulation of sugars in the stem base of nonstored cuttings. Auxin stimulated ARF most strongly in nonstored, less so in light-stored, and only marginally in dark-stored cuttings. A model of auxin-sugar interactions in ARF in carnation is proposed: cold storage brings forward root induction and sink establishment, both of which are promoted by the accumulation of auxin but not of sugars, whereas high levels of sugars and probably also of cytokinins act as inhibitors. Subsequent root differentiation and growth depend on current photosynthesis.



Agullo-Anton, M.A.; Sanchez-Bravo, J.; Acosta, M.; Druege, U. 2011. Auxins or sugars: what makes the difference in the adventitious rooting of stored carnation cuttings. Journal of Plant Growth Regulation 30 (1), 100-113.