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Advanced UV for Life

Description
Staff
Publications
Partners

2014 - 2020

Epidemiological studies revealed that a high consumption of fruits, vegetables, and herbs comes along with a lower risk for cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. This protective effect is mostly due to secondary metabolites to be found in plant tissues. Recently, it has been shown that low dosage exposure to UV-B radiation may positively influence the biosynthesis of these organic compounds during plant growth.

Cooperation Partners

NAME
Location
Country
Ferdinand-Braun-Institut
Berlin
Germany
, BKP Berolina Polyester GmbH & Co. KG
Berlin
Germany
Charité
Berlin
Germany
CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH
Erfurt
Germany
CrysTec GmbH
Berlin
Germany
Emerson Process Management GmbH & Co. OHG
Hasselroth
Germany
Leibniz-Institut für Kristallzüchtung
Berlin
Germany
Fraunhofer IOSB
Ettlingen
Germany
Fraunhofer-Einrichtung für Polymermaterialien und Composite
Teltow
Germany
Freiberger Compound Materials GmbH
Freiberg
Germany
Freie Universität Berlin
Berlin
Germany
Gesellschaft zur Förderung von Medizin-, Bio- und Umwelttechnologien e.V.
Jena
Germany
LayTec AG
Berlin
Germany
MA&T Organisationsentwicklung GmbH
Magdeburg
Germany
OSA Opto Light GmbH
Berlin
Germany
PURION® GmbH
Zella-Mehlis
Germany
Sentech Instruments GmbH
Berlin
Germany
sglux GmbH
Berlin
Germany
Silicann Systems GmbH
Rostock
Germany
Technische Universität Berlin
Berlin
Germany
Technoplot CAD Vertriebs GmbH
Dessau
Germany
Xylem Services GmbH
Herfurt
Germany

The issue is examined jointly by Ferdinand-Braun-Institute and Leibniz Institute of Vegetable and Ornamental Crops within the “Advanced UV for Life” consortium granted by the BMBF program “Zwanzig20 – Partnership for Innovation” (www.advanced-uv.de). Up to now, conventional low-pressure mercury gas-discharge fluorescent lamps have been used as UV-B radiation sources. These lamps deliver only a broadband UV-B radiation making it impossible to determine the wavelength-dependent action spectra of secondary plant metabolites. However, UV-B LEDs recently developed at Ferdinand-Braun-Institute feature a narrow emission spectrum (half width < 10 nm) and a peak emission wavelength that can be tailored to ideally trigger specifically health-promoting secondary plant metabolites.

First experiments have been accomplished with an UV-B LED-based module with an emission at 310 nm. An adjustable uniform irradiance of up to 0.1 W m–2 was obtained at a working distance of 30 cm. That way, the formation of secondary metabolites in Arabidopsis leaves and broccoli sprouts could be successfully enhanced.

Moreover, the Leibniz Institute of Vegetable and Ornamental Crops is within this consortium the coordinator of the research area “Environment & Life Science”.

Other Projects

ENATGLUPRO- Enzymatic and non-enzymatic degradative reactions during the thermal treatment of glucosinolates and their reaction products

Glucosinolates are secondary plant metabolites in crops of the Brassicaceae family (e.g. broccoli, cabbage) that may ...

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HORTicultural INnovations and LEArning for improved nutrition and livelihood in east africa (HORTINLEA)

The HORTINLEA project started in July 2013 and runs for three years with a total budget of approximately 1.5 million euros per year. Two additional...

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Junior Research Group `Detection, Biosynthesis and Function of Flavonoids´

...

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